Providing Quality Divination and Tarot Card Readings On-line; By-Phone; In-Person

Gardening

Divination of The Moment: don’t squash the bugs!

The Hedge Witch Oracle - Ka Pe'elua, The Caterpillar - The Hawaiian Oracle

Our Divination of the moment I drew from The Hawaiian Oracle deck. I fanned the cards from left to right and drew a single card with my left hand signaling it’s origin from the right hemisphere or intuitive seat of the brain. Ka Pe’elua or The Caterpillar was the aumakua or spirit guide selected.

In Ancient Hawai’iKa Pe’elua would feast on the leaves of the ‘Uala or the Hawaiian Sweet Potato. This food staple was crucial to sustaining the Hawaiian population in health and prosperity.  Ancient Hawaiians respected and understood  the natural order of the Universe and did not seek to oppose the Pe’elua by killing it but rather they fostered conditions mutually beneficial by creating an area where the Pe’elua could feed on discarded ‘Uala leaves after removing the caterpillar from the plant.  A supplication asked of the creature requested that it leave the tubers for human consumption in exchange for the delicious leaves, hoping that both species could be supported in life by the ‘Uala, in peaceful coexistence.

Pe’elua’s wisdom speaks to us about creating boundaries on a spiritual level, preventing ourselves from crossing into the realm of retaliation and revenge based on fear of lack, but instead seeking an outcome where there are no losers but winners on both sides. We must find balance in our understanding of perceived threats instead of moving automatically into opposition, squashing what we fear with a heavy hand of vengeful resistance. When we react with destructive fear, spurned on by our entitlements, we create an atmosphere ripe for suffering that ripples out into our environment only to return to us with devastating effects. The results compromise happiness and the natural order of the universe; potentially leading to more conflicts with unimaginable collateral costs.

In Western civilization the solution typically sought to preclude predators from competing for a limited resource calls for destroying the perceived threat. Multinational GMO corporations reap enormous profits from the sale of their patented genetically modified seed crops along with the highly toxic cocktail of proprietary chemicals required to sustain their seeds through maturation by the across the board killing of insects and weeds.

Wholesale destruction of weeds and insects  perceived to threaten food commodities is result of greed and it’s derivative, fear. It’s effects are causing collateral health issues for those Human Beings who digest the GMO products and the exposure to the chemicals needed to cultivate them, as well as, the insects and natural pollinators devastated by the proprietary pesticides. The evolving weeds develop resistance to these contrived chemical killers, compromising their effectiveness, resulting in more and more experimental and untested pesticides being introduced into fragile eco-systems all in the name of furthering profits and purportedly the “progress” of science. Where does it end, this relentless march toward the fruitless domination of nature by the human ego? The Science that perceives the human condition as independent of nature is not science but suicide.

Whether we talk about the conflicts in the middle east; the justification for and the production of genetically modified organisms; or the politicians willing to up-end a fragile economy to get their way without compromise; the wisdom of Ka Pe’elua is clear. Find the common ground first and work for mutually beneficial outcomes that sustain life for all not just the the diabolical ego’s of the powerful.

Rune of The Hedge Witch Oracle
Advertisements

Aside

Relax with glass of Iced Ki : Hawaiian Medicinal Hedge Plants

This is the second post in our Hawaiian Hedge Plant series and we will be outlining the many marvelous uses for the sacred Hawaiian Ki or Ti Plant.

One of the most sacred and versatile plants introduced to Hawai’i by early Polynesian settlers was the Cordyline fruticosa, once considered a member of the Lily family botanists have reclassified the plant as an Agave. Known to Hawaiians as the Ki or Ti Plant, This tightly clustered plant with wide blade-shaped leaves 7 to 10 cm wide and 40 to 80 cm long is fast growing, reaching heights anywhere from 1 to 4 meters.

Hawaiian Ki

Green Ki Plant

This popular and storied Hawaiian hedge plant is considered to bring good luck to those who plant it near their homes. The Ki was sacred to Lono, deity of fertility and music and his consort Laka goddess of the hula or dance. It was used as an emblem of the Ali’i and denoted elite rank, privilege, and divine power. The kahili, (feather standard of royalty and the nobility) in its earliest form, was a Ki stalk with its clustered foliage of glossy, green leaves at the top. The leaves were used by the Kahuna La’au Lapa’au or high priests and administers of the Kapu(ancient Hawaiian law) in many healing, religious, and ceremonial rituals.

Practical Applications for Ki, Ti, Si, La’i – Cordyline fruticosa 

Some of it’s many practical uses included: food wrappings, cups, plates, rain capes, hula skirts, leis, cordage, footwear, hukilau nets, fishing lures, and thatching material.

Ki and Kukui leis

In ancient times the Ki leaf was twisted to create leis worn by high priests and the nobility.

Food and Beverage-

Ki root was baked to extract sugar and the baked Ki root itself was savored as a desert, used as a preferential emergency food in times of famine, and brewed into a beer during pre-contact times which has since evolved into a distilled spirit, known today as Okolehao (iron bottom). Once used as a treatment for scurvy, it is best described as a cross between rum and tequila.

Ki is most likely indigenous to Southeast Asia and was transported throughout the Pacific by Polynesians who used the relatively light weight, compact, starchy rhizome for food during long ocean voyages.

Topical Medicinal Uses-

The natural shape of the Ki leaf lends itself well to creating hot packs, poultices, and herbal wraps packed with other medicinal hedge plants. Here are some simple and effective traditional Hawaiian la’au applications for Ki leaf.

Aches & Pains: For muscle pain and stiffness in joints snugly wrap one large Ki leaf around the joint or muscle area overnight. Repeat for 5 days or as needed.

Back Pain: Wrap heated river stones in Ki leaf and apply to sore muscles for inflammation and pain relief.

Ki leaf with stones

Hot stones were wrapped with Ki leaves and applied to sore muscles.

Fever: Place the Ki leaf in cool water, and then apply the leaf as a compress directly on the effective areas to help reduce fever. Cover the patient with a light sheet, to avoid chilling.

Decongestant: Steam from boiled young green Ki shoots and leaves can be used as an effective decongestant and  the fragrant Ki flowers reduces asthma symptoms.

Stress Relief: Young green Ki shoots can be boiled and chilled to make a muscle relaxant and nerve calming beverage.

Magical or Metaphysical Uses-

Ki stalk was used as a diving rod in the practice of Huli Honua which is akin to the Taoist tradition of Feung Shui. The intuitive understanding of the movement of earths energy fields or Geomancy as practiced by the ancient Hawaiians, was the process of aligning oneself with the mana or energy of the ’aina or the land. Understanding the flow of that mana could be determined with the Ki stalk. The proper alignment of all man-made structures with-in the flow of the earth’s energy fields was essential for harmonious and successful living in ancient Hawai’i.

Today the Ki leaf is used in ritual cleansings and blessings. Dipped in a mix of Hawaiian sea salt with fresh water and accompanied with a pule or prayer, the Ki Leaf is used to sprinkle the holy water over it’s recipient(s); offering divine protection from evil and an invitation for the presence of good.

Aloha nui & Happy Gardening!

HWOracle

Rune of The Hedge Witch Oracle

click here to schedule an appointment with The Hedge Witch Oracle

 


Tarot Card of the Day: The Seven of Pentacles

Tarot Card of the Day: The Seven of Pentacles:

As we prepare to reap what we have sown, and collect the object of our labors the opportunity to examine our true intentions and our current situation is at hand. The Seven of Pentacles reveals to us that through hard work and determination we can nurture our thoughts into material fruit, however, in the moment we are not quite ready to collect the harvest as our labors have not fully ripened. It is often in this moment of re-evaluation that our true intent becomes realized and the pesky pests that lie in our past attachments emerge from the subconscious to gnaw on our potential. Fear of success, is a vague and elusive rat. To the unrealized mind this is the moment when things mysteriously begin to fall apart, right before the harvest, when our burgeoning ideas and self-confidence begins to falter and the weeds of doubt and the vermin of fear destroy our co-creative efforts. Onipa’a, be steadfast for the harvest is at hand!  The Seven of Pentacles asks us to stop and pause to re-examine your reasons for working so hard and whether it’s the path you truly should be following. Re-affirm your commitment to your own happiness and take the next step as the pay off is right around the corner. Be weary of letting your fears stop you from receiving what you have worked so hard to achieve.

Leaning upon his hoe, a farmer pauses to regard his efforts which are flowering abundantly on the vine, soon the flowers or The Seven Pentacles will transform into fruit and the time of reaping will begin. To the Ancient Hawaiians the vine growing Ipu was tended to with great care and skill. Flies and maggots would often overwhelm the blossoms impeding pollination and the slightest jostling or bruising of the young gourds would cause the fruit to rot. The vigilant gardener keeps the pests at bay so that verdant ideas may bear fruit.


Indigenous Hawaiian Garden planned at the Bishop Museum

Indigenous Hawaiian Garden planned at the Bishop Museum
 
A fun little Hedge Witch diversion is to scratch around in the garden plots of other gardeners worthy of emulation. Of course it’s always advisable to be personable and get permission lest you find your behind beset with birdshot. There is always lots to learn from the successes and failures of others and keen observation can reap big rewards. 
 
Here is an exciting development for a hands on educational opportunity.
The Bishop Museum has broken ground last month on an exhibit which will feature indigenous plants of Hawai’i, in an interactive garden setting. The outdoor exhibit will be located on the 12 acre museum grounds and will feature flora important to native Hawaiian culture. President and CEO Timothy Johns stated in a press release that “This is the museum’s first step in remaking its entire campus into a ‘living exhibit’ of native and Polynesian-introduced plants which link the cultural artifacts on display in Hawaiian Hall,”
 
Scheduled for completion this summer, the garden will have educational activities and tours on a daily basis and will focus primarily on three groupings of both indigenous and imported flora.
 
  • The first grouping will consist of Coastal plants. Vegetation that voyagers might have seen upon reaching the Hawaiian shoreline, plants such as ‘ilima and hinahina.   
  • The second grouping will focus on Canoe Plants that were brought to Hawai’i by the islands’ first settlers, such as hala, ‘ulu, coconut, and kalo. 
  • And the lastly the Native Dry Forest Plants; recreating theoretically, how Hawai’i’s forests might have looked like, in ancient times. 

From a hedge witch perspective it will be interesting to see what medicinal plants will be included in the exhibit  and I’m particularly interested in the Native Dry Forest Plants.